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the highway. >> she walked quite a distance in a very, very threatening environment. it is very blackout here and very dark. it is very steep. it is brushy and there is also coyotes in the background. to someone who was raised in a more urban environment as opposed to a rural setting that can be quite intimidating. >> the girl's father died from his injuries, but she escaped from the crash and her trek through the wilderness with a few cuts and bruises. >>> a round of nasty weather forced the cancellation of a professional golf tournament in florida. look how dangerous conditions were with strong wind gusts and even blowing over the large media center. tense moments after it was evacuated. the storm put a damper on tiger woods' golf game. suspending play. woods only got in two holes thus delayed play until tomorrow. the tornado warning was issued, but there are no confirmed sight ings tonight. and for the weather here in the bay area, let's get to leigh glaser who is tracking what is ahead. >> right now live doppler 7hd and we are not picking up any returns at all, but we are starting to see
. that is operated on by the environment and health choices. the genome, now revealing a lot of its secrets to us, is helping us to nail down what that heredity looks like and how we may learn enough about it to influence outcomes, so if you are born with a high risk of alzheimer's, maybe there is something you can do about it before you get the disease. >> when you sent christopher hitchens, what did he do in st. louis? >> he was examined by the cancer experts. they conducted dna analysis from his blood, and that could tell you the dna he was born with, and then they could look at the specific dna in the cancer cells.cancer is a disease in the genome. cancer comes about because of mistakes in the dna you are born with, causing them to grow when they should not, and in his cancer genome, they found a dozen or so mistakes that were acquired during life that were driving those cells to grow, and at least one of those not previously described suggested the possibility of using a therapy you would not normally have contemplated for esophageal cancer, so there was a chance to try something that was ra
specific stance, it's a wealth effect-type stance, it's a very low- interest-rate environment, and i think that investors feel that the only real value right now, the only real place to put their money, is stocks; and clearly the perception of value is to the upside, otherwise we wouldn't have closed on highs on friday. > ben, have a great trading day. thank you. > > my pleasure. thank you. carnival cruise lines faces at least four lawsuits, inlcuding a class-action suit, after thousands of passengers were adrift for five days aboard a disabled carnival cruise ship last month. since then, three more carnival cruise ships have reported operational problems to either online systems or their backups, all of which coincides with carnival scaling back projected earnings. four incidents aboard carnival cruise ships in little more than a month led sandra thompson to cross carnival off her list for her next trip. "originally, i considered carnival because it was the least expensive; but after all this, i decided it's worth the extra money, and so royal carribbean is what i'm looking at now." carni
it back here, but they're worried bringing it here and having it here under this environment. there's an amazing opportunity being lost. >> neil: think about if you're looking at the economy turning around and betting on a turn-around obviously you would use that money and invest in plants and equipment and new shops and all. but what a lot of these companies tend to do, boost the dividends, buy back stock, and maybe take out a competitor, but they don't expand. >> well, one of the problems with apple is, i mean, it's got a problem because it's too successful. it's got this cash and you want to be careful that you don't do something stupid with it and apple keeps selling more iphones by spending more money and avoid making acquisitions. and sisco bought the flip video camera and the fact that they were able to sit on it, is an indicator of how well it's doing. >> neil: charlie. >> i would say this is a big debate in america. jeff immelt said in a world where you have to worry about terrorism at any point you need a lot of cash on hand, what that might do to your business. >> neil: a
about it having it here under this environment. there is an amazing opportunity being lost. >> neil: think about if you are looking at the economy turning around and betting on a turnaround you would use that money and invest in equipment, new shops. what a lot of these companies tend to do is boost their dividend, buy back stock, take out a competitor but they don't expand? >> one of the problems with apple it's got a problem because it's too successful. you want to be careful that you don't do something with it. apple can't sell more iphones by spending more money. it needs to avoid making acquisitions, cisco bought the flip camera business and it was a disaster because the company was under pressure to spend the money. the fact of sitting on the money is how well they are doing. >> i would say this is a big debate in corporate america. imelt addressed it in a world that you have to worry about terrorism you need to keep a lot of cash on hand. >> neil: sit good or bad sign to you? >> it's not good. tax reform would help, but i assure you apple is not afraid of repay tree eighting
the power at landmark buildings for one hour to raise awareness of the impact we have on the environment. >> i think it's a good idea to remind people that you don't need all these lights here, and how much'm -- >> ama: here in the bay area the lights will go off at 8:30 at buildings like city hall. this year san francisco is considered the earth hour capitol city. selected from 29 cities participating in the earth power challenge inch just a few hours even the new bay bridge light installation will go dark for one hour tonight. >> women's history month is being celebrated with a series of educational and inspirational events, congresswoman jacky spear of san francisco hosted forums that included our own kristen sze as a panelist. the series features women doctors doctors and airline pilots and journalists, telling their stories to help inspire young girls to go for their dreams. >>> just ahead, the streak across the sky stirring up a frenzy online. >> a warning for shoppers. check out the new i-pad before you leave the store. the unwanted surprise some buyers are getting. >>> a beautifu
of trading. keep that in mind. it's a fabulous environment. last week's other four ipos were up 14% to 20% on the first day. all the tech names work so well. that's why i wanted to introduce you to a new company. it's called pinnacle foods. it's a house of food brands. some say b&g expecting to become public on thursday. pinnacle is a company you never heard of, i bet. but your products can be found in 85% of american house holds. you would recognize their brands. they've got a big frozen food business with bird's eye frozen vegetables, mrs. paul's seafood, lender's bagels, celeste pizza, as well as hungry man frozen meals which i thought looked like a delicious heart attack in a box. and pinnacle has a grocery business. you know them as duncan hines, cookie and cake miss, mrs. butterworth, log cabin, comstock pie filling. as we know from hines from its all-time high last month, iconic brands are the landmark. blackstone is ringing the register on its investment taking the company public. recent history suggests these deals are performing extremely well. case in point, since the beginning
another, of the environment. let us not allow that time for destruction and death accompany our journey of this world. >> pope francis' homily. a man whose middle name is francis, named after francis of assissi, just like the new pope. every man called francis. >> and you were named after francis of assissi, as the new pope. >> well, growing up in our house, francis of assissi was right up there with the virgin mary because of what he stood for, his concern for the poor, environment, i mean, this guy was way ahead of his time. >> the pope tweeted today true power and service all people, especially the poor. that is his reputation. what do you want to say about the new pope? >> i want to be optimistic right now. some things that he said, like all the other bishops, about gay marriage and abortion, you know, they're just not in this century yet. but this man's approach is very different. and i was thinking the other day that i remember back when gorbachav was named and they said oh, he's the same as the other guys. he changed the world. >> and this is giving you hope and giving me hope. >
to you and to many israelis, israel must embed itself in its environment. israel must be integrated into the region as a good citizen as long as the palestinians, and i'm both as a scholar of the middle east and also as an american. as long as the palestinians remain disinherited, they will be there peace and stability. israel is very powerful. israel is a fortress. but all of us would like to see the jewish community fully integrated into that part of the world by reaching a settlement based on security and peace and reconciliation. this is the way to go. and abbas, anyone else. the reality, i'm choosing my words very carefully. the israelis will never find a better partner than mahmoud abbas who has fully accepted a settlement based on a two-state solution. full security for israel and dignity for the palestinians and a viable state on the, what we call the 23% of what used to be historic palestine. >> abbas has called israel a land of jesus and mohamed. so i'm not sure he is interested in any israeli sovereignty. >> professor, thank you very much. >>> up next, chris christie gets
sense. in the immediate environment we're in today, one of these media campaigns can be a flash in the pan. but i think this is a long game and think it's a long game for good reason. i actually disagree with the governor that these politicians are necessarily being stupid. by going against the public on the issue. because this is one of those asymmetrical issues. most people are in favor of universal background checks, but the people who care about it are going to vote on the issue, are disproportion eige porgportiona opposed to them. i think we need to convince voters who are in favor of background checks to hold politicians accountable for their votes on it i think it's supportable, because violent crime has been in decline for 20 years -- >> not gun-related crime. >> i want to talk about that. finish your point first. >> i think the reason that the political environment is actually more difficult for gun control now than it was 20 years ago is because people are less afraid of violent crime than they used to be. and so i think it takes some convincing to tell people no reall
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, they're trying to do their job, and they've created an open environment, an environment envisioned in our constitution, but they're finding themselves falling, if you will, back on this whole question of you've got to hit certain numbers, af gyou've goto force the numbers. that was legitimate for the supreme court. this is a president who picks people to promote because they support his ideology rather than the rule of law. >> this is a man headed up the civil rights division at which the inspector general concluded there's a racial hostility within that department that remains deeply divided over whether cases enforcing rights under the voting rights laws should ever be brought or should be brought with any consistency, where the victims in those voting cases are white and the defendants are black. that's under mr. perez and even some on the left have been saying, enough is enough. eric holder personally needs to answer for that ig's report. although it's gotten very scant coverage. so do you believe that that is a potential issue for mr. perez on his confirmation to head up the l
related to each other, as long as the current environment exists as it does come interest rates as low as they are, there's really no incentive for washington to get back together and fix the fiscal situation because they are not forced to. so you say they will be by when, 2015, middle of the year? it'll be a while, in other words. dagen: it will be a while, but the good news is the budget deficit is actually declining. suggesting a decline for the next three years, so there's a little bit of time in washington to get it right. it is not as imminent, you have not done sequestration, but it is still the fed, all about the fed. what the market will be focused on is not so much when they will raise rates because that is forever into the future, but will they be skimming back the 85 billion in purchases? i don't think there will be any sign that will happen. i think it is helping the economy. connell: you agree with the policy? >> i agree with the policy, but what is propping up the stock market is the better economy. and i cannot attribute that alter the fed. a lot of people don't think t
of my idols in business. they can't do as well in this environment. why is qlik view doing well if oracle can't? >> i think we are in one spot, they're total market. i think we drive the next generation of software. ease of use, time to value, agility and flexibility are the key drivers. more and more corporations are seeing that. if i don't empower my employees to make smarter decisions, i'm missing out on a big opportunity. we've been in that business for 20 years. we only focused on the user and the user's behavior when it comes to interacting with data. >> mark benioff has been on our show from sales force. he's trying to develop a dashboard people can use, sales people can use on the road, for instance. why is yours better than his or do they work together? >> they work together. i think mark built a great company. he's disrupted an industry just like we are doing in this industry we are in. one of our most common data sources for our clients is his system. so we sit on top of sales force and maybe two or three other sources and provide you with a dashboard of insight from
's environment where interest rates, in general, are so low, why take a chance? you know, it's not just on that side of the atlantic. you know, we got 0% interest rates in america. why leave money on deposit in a bank to get 0% when there's inflation, and, you know, nose are the two largest banks in cypress that failed. our two largest banks, bank of america and citi bank have over $2 trillion in total deposits. the fdic has near $25 billion in treasuries. if our largest banks were to fail, we don't have anywhere near reserves to come close to the insurance deposits let alone all deposits. sandra: let's get jordan in here, an analyst in our power panel tonight. jordan, i guess this here is going to be used -- this bailout will be used as a template for future bailouts, and that investors say, well, my money's not safe, i'm going to take it and go somewhere else. do you believe that to be the case? >> right. no, not currently just because when i look at the global markets, if you review the major european nations like germany or france, you don't see the dee tier ration that there's -- d
for a strong working environment for middle class. we have a different vision on how to get there. one is a government run or government -- where things are dictated from healthcare to regulations. those are the kinds of things i believe stifle growth. i'm part of our freshman group working on regulatory reform. we are going to talk about that. is not take away the ability for someone to take away the pea, -- epa, but it helps those affected by it. there are real business affected. regulations are cutting -- the best way to help this country is to get washington in that so that it is -- so our free-trade agreements can work, so that our products can be sold overseas. free-trade trade is what we need to be part of. follow up onter, your syrian comments, "so you are against sending troops to syria?" said. that's not what i we have to figure out what is the proper role for us to play in syria. again, a comment i heard this morning -- what do we have a un for if it is completely useless ? i agree that right now, the un is basically useless in this situation. here is one thing that is ,mazi
people together. i think partly it was the circumstances and the environment we had to confront. devissive had very times. the schedule has changed a lot. we would work longer weeks and people were there for a longer period of time. the venues for communication were much more readily at hand. we had -- we used to have two lunch tables that are just for senators and you'd is it family style and people would have lunch together. and for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we get together and one was around our spouses and we'd salute or spouse. we'd do things like that. but i think the single biggest thing people leave washington so much more routinely on thursday or friday and don't come back till monday or tuesday and you are left to govern on wednesday. you can't govern a country as big and sophisticated as this one is one or two days a week. they have been in session 11 days in february which we've got to ground the airplane. we're going to have to say you're going to have to stay here. maybe what we ought to do is have blocks of tim
-chairs heard of the need for an environment of intellectual curiosity that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hack-a-thons in tax-heavy cities like san francisco, austin, denver and new york to forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we'll embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we'll upgrade gop.com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're going to be setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to the silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologynologists -- technologists to join in our efforts and serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all of this, we'll enter 2014 and 2016 with a
into that school building because it will create a better environment for success and help keep that neighborhood solid and grow things. >> governor snyder, thanks so much for talking with us. chris, back to you. >>> rehema, governor snyder, thank you. >>> and you're looking live at ayman, jo o oman, jordan. here are president obama and king abdullah of jordan. this is the final country that president obama will visit on his middle east trip. let's go to them now. >> all jordanians to welcome you and your distinguished delegation back here in jordan. i fondly remember your visit here several years ago when you were a senator, it is a great delight to welcome you back to jordan as the president of the united states enjoying your second term. we're delighted with the in-depth discussions that were very, very fruitful on the strategic and historic partnership. and you've been an old friend as has the united states for so many decades. we are very grateful, to you, sir, and the administration as well as congress and the american people for the continuous support that has been shown to jordan over so
-qe and nonzero interest rate policy environment. the federal reserve has drilled rates down to zero because they cannot get gdp to grow because of tight regulation on the middle class. with zero percent rates, the saver earns next to noing, and the typical american family has no access to the american credit markets. >> i think we have a table we want to put up. you're basically saying that u.s. deposits are a little different from the cyprus story. u.s. savers have been badly damaged by the federal reserve policy. >> it's basically like a tax. if interest rates were at 2%, u.s. savers would earn 2% a year. last four years, they would have compounded out at 9%. instead, their earnings are basically zero, and they're underwriting the profits of the banks. >> jimmy, your response? >> you look globally at long-term interest rates, where are they going globally? down, down, down, even where banks aren't doing quantitative easing. those low rates reflect a weak economy. people aren't one thing. sure, they're savers, but they're also equity investors, who have done very nicely of late. if we foll
is not only the environment -- although he did use the word environment -- but it's also us. it's you and me, our brothers and sisters, it's moms and dads. that's part of our mission in life, to be of service to others. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> we tried to get out of the way of the music from time to time. it's mid 50's in rome this morning and pretty steady wind at 15 to 20 miles an hour. you can see making for a beautiful sight with the flags there. the music is not one choir but two. lauren green with some details on those. one of them sang at the pap al mass. >> this is the sistine chapel choir along with the sacred music choir. both of them are vatican choirs. interesting enough, the last time i heard the sistine chapel choir was in november when they premiered a work by monsignor raptsinger, the brother of pope benedict xvi. they are an incredible choir. you saw one of the members, sopranos singing earlier as part of the mass. they are an incredible choir. they have sung all over the world and they are known all over the world, and they sing in many sacred music festivals. they are mainstays of
that but certainly underlines the political nature of the administration's handling of the post-benghazi environment. and i can't wait to read these memos. i'm sure they will be a real treat. i think it will simply increase demands in congress for answers about the real facts of benghazi that after six months we still haven't gotten skbri mean, the thoughts on hacking, everybodies that -- everybody has their feeling how this should be handled the law doesn't crack down on people's ability to tap into private exchanges. one thing i think it truly highlights here, if there is a need in social media, even extending into the law breakers, to learn more about what happened, it does, does it not, say something about the energy in this country to produce some truth in this matter? >> yeah. i think there should be more protection for intellectual property on the internet, for people's own communications but i certainly have no faith in the privacy protections now. that is why my e-mails are pretty boring. this is a, dealing with sensitive matters of national security does raise a question, i think, whether
as we've really created institutions and our community and environment where everybody else wanted to achieve access to care. the party had conversation another these deceptions deceptions and health care services or deception in providers. we also have to knowledge the historical experiences of mistreatment and mistrust in communities of color as well as lgbt communities have experienced discrimination, but also discrimination trying to get access to the system. as a look at health care reform implementation, it's not just that the benefits for quite. it's about whether or not the lgbt americans were overwhelmingly and acted will have access to this health care services they need. at the end of 80s talking about the treatment cascade for the analysis by age and race is that a younger american people of color is less likely to experience depression and less likely to be engaged in the health care system. there's a story behind that we haven't necessarily cut to the heart of, but if are going to address health disparities, will have a chance that has to be seated in conversation or
environment. >> i am glad you brought up the fact that you're dealing with the c.r.'s. it has been suggested that this is on you. let's take the timeout the last three years. was it your idea to pass a 14- day continuing resolution or a 21-day continuing resolution? or a seven-day, 165-day, a one- day, a six-day? how you run a government or a branch of government with c.r.'s that go for that short amount of time? how do you adequately budget for that? >> it is very difficult. we err on the side of being conservative, as we have here, to make sure we are not deficient at the end of any given continuing resolution. it is difficult. we are a very large operation. we are taking in over 400,000 people a year. and if it has to go on for the full year. when you are in an environment where you do not know what your budget is going to be on the various marks and the house and the senate are different, when you are looking at sequestration, it is a challenge and you do your best under the circumstances to come up with the right answer. >> as you went through the releases and you sit here today, do you
for in this type of environment. >> there is someone here to see you. >> let him in. >> he is a detective. he is here assisting, this couple, luke and laura, and helping them. >> this couple luke and laura. >> this couple luke and laura. they're like the big. >> yeah, sorry, yeah, yeah, yeah. >> luke and laura are soap legends after all. elizabeth taylor was a legend too who appeared on "gh" in the early '80s. rick remembers her well. >> doing a scene with elizabeth taylor, walking off arm in arm, the camera fades to black. she goes "acting is so stupid." >> so, i will tell you what. >> tell me. >> a lot of soap operas are leaving because nobody is watching. union of the young people are watching. i started watching soap operas a year ago. i am hooked on "general hospital." i can't wait. >> the rage in 1981. >> you would know because? >> i remember all this. a freshman in high school. all the girls talked about. >> you never watched. >> dr. drake. >> you never watched. >> not really. unless i was with them trying to get on their good side. >> there you go. g to get on their good side. >> ther
to see their greatest fears realized in a safe environment. and i think that's what's going on here. personally, for me, this movie is like a sharp stick in my eye. i will not be watching it. it is like banging my head against the trash can. i don't think so. it leaves me feeling so empty at the end, like having sex with somebody i don't like. i can't do it. i just can't. i can't. >> not touching that. rita, last word. last word. >> pretty much i haven't seen the movie just yet, but i've seen the trailer. i haven't seen it just yet, but i plan on seeing it. any and everything that could be close to reality, i want to see it because if i see the signs, i know i need to run. it is a little, i think a little -- really violent, and, but, it is fiction. it is just a movie. people have to understand that. >> rita davis, rebecca cardin, paul mercurio and chris freights, thanks to you all. appreciate it. >>> now this. questions of a conspiracy by a white supremacist gang in a murder of a prison chief. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. >>> the amazing race apologizes to veterans over a --
for that cycle of prosperity that i described to happen. the job of our government is to create an environment where people are encouraged to and it is easier for them to risk the money they have access to in order to start up a new business or grow an existing business so they can hire more people and create more jobs for others. there's a lot of things that government can do to help create that environment but there are few that are being discussed. i want to point to three. the first thing is predictability. what do i mean by predictability? what i mean by that is that when someone decides i'm going to open up a business, one of the things that encourages them to hire people is that they know what tomorrow's going to look like. they know what the taxes are going to be, they know what the laws are going to be, they know what the economy's going to look like, and so they feel encouraged because they can pl plan, because they know what tomorrow looks like. imagine now for a moment if you are a businessman or a businesswoman and is deciding whether to hire five people next year or not. one of t
world leaders on the big spring, he having told them to respect the environment, think about the weak and the poor. once again this pope bringing his simple style to the most grand of ceremonies. catholics and the simply curious of every color and creed gathered for a ceremony stretching back thousands of years. 132 official delegations from around the world came, and leaders of every faith. few religious celebrations as grand, or steeped in ritual as the installation of a pope in the catholic church. from early in the day, hundreds of thousands poured into the square. the pope choosing to greet them in an open jeep instead of the well-protected pope mobile. at one point stepping down, reaching out to children, the sick. the cheers of the faithful here, an audible embrace. then the 266th pope praying at the tomb of peter, leaders alongside him healing the divide 1,000 years old. here to witness history, vice president biden and royalty, a humble priest from south america, his message, remember the poor. a communion shared by all, a day no one will forget. and in the last half hour, vi
smoke. if you're in an environment were other people are smoking, you are breathing what they exhale. you're not doing it intentionally. he may not even be doing it knowingly with your being what they're putting out there. their smoking is not just harming them in terms of their potential of getting lung cancer, and is also affecting all the people who are breathing the same air. it's that idea that it's not aned that people they'll rescued us from the conundrum we are in. it is that we need to educate ourselves about where the sources of power are. we need to look not at the sneetches by sylvester mcmonkey mcbean to find out where the power is and to use that learning to distribute power in a very different way. thsi may sound -- this may sound -track so i have invited one of my former students who was a terrific didn't, someone who was president of his class at columbia -- a terrific students, who was president of his class at columbia, he cracked a whip from harvard law poetry, the 200 nuyorican slam winner. example ofbody an racial healing mercy so we can get the benefit of your
what this creates is an environment where, well, we don't know. we don't know. it could be another fake one. another duke lacrosse situation and damn her for doing what she did. she should be taken into custody. >> megyn: she stole his life, david. she stole it. five years, plus he had this promising football future. and i mean, if you heard him in the interview he seemed like an earnest young man and wants to move on with his life, but this problem is bigger than just brian banks now. and the system has a problem and there is a real question about whether the system needs to ask this young woman for some justice. >> well, you know, there's no question about it, megyn. and props to my law school whose assisted in his exoneration. and the prosecution would be giving false information which is a misdemeanor in california, now, the victim himself, now the victim in this case, mr. banks, does not want to go forward with the prosecution. he doesn't want to cooperate ap also, megyn, you have the third prong of this problem, even though the dna, the defense attorney got dna test and said it wa
strong, to protect our communities and environment and uphold the sacred commitment that we have made to our veterans. mr. president, i believe that our budget reflects the values and priorities of the vast majority of families across our country. it is a responsible and credible approach, and it offers a clear path to a balanced and bipartisan deal. house republicans are debating a very different approach this week. the proposal that passed through their budget committee would be devastating for our economic recovery and threaten millions of jobs. it would make extreme cuts to the investments in infrastructure and education and innovation that we need right now to lay down a strong foundation for a broad-based economic growth. it would dismantle medicare and would cut off programs to support the middle class and most vunchl families and it would do all that while refusing to ask the wealthiest americans and biggest corporations to even contribute their fair share. mr. president, the american people are going to have an opportunity to examine these budgets side by side over the coming
money at this current time in this environment on capitol hill kind of goes against the grain but that is the key way that we can convert our good intentions to real, live aid and make a difference in people's lives on the ground. >> in my testimony are some of the ways we are rushing to help communities who are strained by the influx of refugees, and working with the governments of both these countries to provide additional support. it is an important question, one we are deeply focused on. >> thank you, mr. chairman and folks on the panel for your attendance. ambassador ford, i am wondering regarding the redline, i want some specifics -- what are the possible consequences, and i share your current skepticism, what are the range of possible consequences the american people can expect from the administration as a response? >> congressman, i really do not want to speculate here about hypothetical situations. what i do want to underline that the president has said there will be consequences and that we will seek strongly that the people who use chemical weapons be held accountab
strategic environment and about america's interest forward. finally i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of the most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. fors equally known brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his success in battles in the iraq war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain trus
is the fruit. so even you... could've had a v8. can >>> good saturday afternoon, i am craig mel environment you are watching msnbc. the place for politics. >>> the senate speaks on the key step pipeline a decision from the president is expected soon. we thought it would be a good time to separate fact from fiction on that. >>> a wrap on obama's trip to the middle east. what he acokofrcomp -- accompli. >>> 98 days since newtown and more than 2200 dead. now a branch of the nra is fighting the first gun law passed after that school shooting. let's start with our top political headlines this hour. >>> late yesterday, caitlin hall began withdrew her nomination to a federal appeals court, handing a victory to republicans in the senate who twice blocked the president's pick for the key judicial post h president obama said in a statement, "i am deeply disappointed that even after nearly two and a half years, a minority of senators continue to block a simple up or down vote on her nomination." >>> the democratically led senate rejected paul ryan's budget this week and passed its own in the wee hours of
the environment and the poorest and the weakest. cansaid a little tenderness open up a horizon of hope. >> 34 years ago we began providing televised access to congress and the every day workings of the government. c-span, created in 1979 by america's cable companies and brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> the winners have been selected in this year's c-span's studentcam documentary competition on the theme "your message to the president.'' the grand prize winner was josh. first prize for his work on the economy and spending. one person prize with a documentary on transportation along with two other boys. see all the videos on our website. >> "washington journal" continues. host: merideth shiner is a staff writer for roll call. here's a headline from a recent piece -- are sixhere subcommittees and of those, three of them are not shared by women. threedition to those p chaired by women, three of them subcommittee is chaired by women. given the history of women in politics, it's a pretty remarkable thing. the other thing they are doing, they're not just coming to t
bron james, gives miami a two-point lead. >> the heat is definitely on. >> this is a hostile environment, for to us come in and get a big road win on the road, awesome. >> you're live in the cnn newsroom. >>> good morning. thank you for joining me. i'm carol cosstello. steubenville, ohio, two teenagers due in court accused of making online threats in the explosive rape case. the latest ripple in a case that blown the town apart. the victim raped by two high school ftball players, two local girls, one 15, the other 16, spent the night in juvenile detention. the victim's mother is pleading for calm and compassion. >> my family and i are hopeful that we can put this horrible ordeal behind us. we need and deserve to focus on our daughter's future. we hope that from this, something good good can arise. i feel i have an opportunity to bring an awareness to others, possibly change the mentality of a youth or help a parent to have more of an awareness of where their children are and what they are doing. adults need to take responsibility, guide these children. i ask every person listening, what
, and epa, our corporations are putting more chemicals into our environment and into our food, making us sick. chemicals are chemicals. we have got to get our own -- this is democrats in indiana. caller: good morning. thank you for having me on. with president obama going to israel, the point i don't get still, what about the palestinians? is a separateic topic. this is u.s. policy towards syria. what do you think should be u.s. policy towards syria? caller: right now, i don't think we should be the police of the world. --should work to resolve this is an internal issue in syria. if he goes over the border, we should look into it. but we should deal not by ourselves but through other nations, the other arab nations. that is what they are there for. i am not quick about sending our troops to get killed and another war again. here john is a republican in the suburbs and alexandra, virginia. caller: good morning, thank you for taking my call. in regard to u.s. involvement in the commander testified to the senate last week or two is toogo that it propagated, the situation in we don't terms o
. the outcome of these particular systems are uknown for the environment. it would be beneficial to the assistance to knock down long- range missiles. host: are you familiar with this? guest: you probably want a meteorologist to talk about these questions. one comment i would make is that weather systems are so enormously powerful compared to even nuclear-weapons in terms of the amount of energy that the idea of modifying them is a daunting proposition. even if we are thinking in non- military terms about hurricanes, my understanding of the problem is that we are quite a ways away from being able to do that. one thing we do not understand is the implications of any intervention leawood try to carry out. these weather systems are intervention we would try to carry up. these budde systems are enormous. not since the debate is not important for the issue is irrelevant. i think we are a ways away from being able to do things with the weather. host: this point on our twitter host: let us go to ramie from baltimore, maryland. caller: a couple of quick points. i think we are talking abo
. the media environment is vast. what represent fully indications will -- what represent fully -- what ramifications will come? what if i do have a government job? you never know. we heard about what happened in benghazi before during and after, not heeding warnings, covering up not quick enough. maybe survivors feel the story is already out there. i'm not sure. >>brian: everyone has a different perspective on the iraq war but yours is valuable because you fought in it. what's your thought ten years since it started? >> it's almost hard to fathom ten years since the war kicked off. i'm proud of what our generation of warriors accomplished, what we fought for. everything that we -- over 4,400 that gave their lives on that sacred ground. thousands more that were wounded in pursuit of that mission. i'm proud of what we did over there. i'm proud of coming home and fighting for the surge, fighting for the will of the american people to finish the job. i wish we finished it in a more proper fashion per se. i honor what these vets have done, and we're thanking them every day. >>brian: what do
jobs, clean up the environment, and be able to keep our way of life going on the chesapeake bay. so, madam president, you can see why today we just had three great marylanders, each doing a very different thing, but what i'm so proud of with, you know, captain cullen, larry symms, christina quigley is that each in their own way was trying to make a difference, wanted to protect america. the other was to protect jobs and a way of life on the chesapeake bay. and the other to inspire young women not only to be ready for the playing fields of la crosse but for the playing fields of life. all three, in her own way, were inspirational leaders. all three, in their own way, made a difference in the lives of the people that they came in touch w i just want to say, god bless them and god treat them kindly and may their souls rest in peace. madam president, i yield the floor. ms. mikulski: madam president, i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call:
about money or the environment. >> i think life's about experiences and about connection and about relationships. and so i think you want to sort of maximize your time focused on that and minimize your time focused on acquiring more stuff and dealing with it. >> now, graham hill does acknowledge that if you're married or you have children, the minimalist lifestyle is a lot tougher, matt lauer. >> i'll say, the older you get, the more you like that no-clutter feel. thank you very much. i would like to try it, craig, thank you. >> thank you. >> when we come back, martha stewart's here to make us all feel inadequate about decorating our easter eggs. but first, this is "today" on nbc. for your first day? yeah. ♪ dad: you'll be fine, ok? girl: ok. dad: you look so pretty. ♪ i'm overprotective. that's why i got a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >>> martha on "today" is brought to you by macy's. >> and we're back at 8:51 with martha. fun and festive ways to decorate your easter eggs. martha stewart is here with a few of her ideas straight from the pages of "martha st
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